A day in Kyoto, Japan's ancient capital Print This Page

KYOTO GOURMET DAY

AM

©Y.Shimizu/©JNTO

(1)WAK Japan

Food shopping at Nishiki market
Shop for your own ingredients in the "kitchen of Kyoto" Nishiki market with the expert tutoring of your guide.

Kyoto cooking workshop and lunch
Experience something you cannot in a restaurant by cooking and eating a recipe that is a typical choice on an average day for a Kyoto family.

PM

©Kyoto Convention Bureau/©JNTO

(2)Fushimi Inari Grand Shrine
As a post-lunch constitution climb up through the vermillion tunnels of hundreds of 'torii' shring gates at this shinto shrine to the deity of harvest, and thereby sake production.
(3)Gekkeikan
Fushimi Sake Tasting
Finish the day be getting some indepth knowledge of the features of local sakes from an expert guide and one of Kyoto's most famous exports, Gekkeikan brewery.

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UNESCO DAY

AM
(1)Kinkakuji
Enjoy the iconic golden pavilion and its reflection in the glass-still reflection pond.
(2)Ryoanji
Move from one icon to the next, Ryoanji is famous for the rock and gravel garden that most imagine to be the defining Zen Buddhist garden.
(3)Lunch overlooking the Kamo river
Funatsuru Kyoto Kamogawa Resort
PM
(4)Nijo Castle
Nijo castle is the impressive Kyoto home for the shogunate military leaders. Experience walking on the days next icon, the singing nightingale floor.

©Y.Shimizu/©JNTO

(5)Kiyomizu Temple
End the day looking over Kyoto from the fourth and final icon, Kiyomizu temple's gigantic cliff-face stage.

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TEA DISCOVERY DAY

AM
(1)Tondaya

Tea ceremony while wearing kimono
Discovery more about the links between kimono and the tea ceremony and the roles of each in 21st century Kyoto daily life by combining the two at this 130 year old Kyoto merchant house, and registered national treasure.

Tondaya bento

Lunch
Stay on at the house for a little longer to enjoy a tradtional Kyoto merchant's lunch, handmade on site.

PM
(2)Kenninji zen meditation
Take your understanding of the tea ceremony on a step at Kyoto's oldest Zen Buddhist temple, Kenninji, and find out why tea was first used by Zen Buddhist priests exclusively.

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